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AP Photos: Chauvin sentencing caps tumult since Floyd death


              FILE - In this May 25, 2020, file photo, from police body camera video George Floyd responds to police after they approached his car outside Cup Foods in Minneapolis. Former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin faces decades in prison when he is sentenced Friday, June 25, 2021, following his murder and manslaughter convictions in the death of George Floyd. Floyd's death, filmed by a teenage bystander as Chauvin pinned Floyd to the pavement for about 9 and a half minutes and ignored Floyd's "I can't breathe" cries until he eventually grew still, reignited a movement against racial injustice that swiftly spread around the world and continues to reverberate. (Court TV via AP, Pool, File)
FILE - In this May 25, 2020, file photo, from police body camera video George Floyd responds to police after they approached his car outside Cup Foods in Minneapolis. Former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin faces decades in prison when he is sentenced Friday, June 25, 2021, following his murder and manslaughter convictions in the death of George Floyd. Floyd's death, filmed by a teenage bystander as Chauvin pinned Floyd to the pavement for about 9 and a half minutes and ignored Floyd's "I can't breathe" cries until he eventually grew still, reignited a movement against racial injustice that swiftly spread around the world and continues to reverberate. (Court TV via AP, Pool, File)

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — More than a year of tumult that followed George Floyd 's death under Derek Chauvin's knee culminates Friday when the former Minneapolis police officer hears his sentence for murder.

Floyd died after Chauvin pinned him for about 9 1/2 minutes after police were summoned to a report of a man passing a counterfeit bill at a grocery store.

A teenage bystander's cellphone video carried the agony of Floyd's death around the world, and the outrage was immediate, with thousands of protesters taking to the streets for demonstrations. Many were peaceful, but violence and arson marred several desperate nights in the first week after Floyd's death, including the burning of the 3rd Precinct station that was home to the four officers charged in Floyd's death.

Friday's sentencing won't be the last word on the upheaval that followed Floyd's death. Chauvin is likely to appeal his state sentence. The other three fired officers still face state charges, and all four are charged with federal civil rights violations. And the city of Minneapolis continues to wrestle with whether and how to remake its police department.

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